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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
-- >> what happened in france is being watched closely, because europe faces us see us strikes as governments bareback cherished benefits. bbc news, paris. >> the spanish prime minister and has called on a basket separatist movement to lay down its arms forever. -- of basque separatist movement to lay down its arms forever. mozambique has reversed its decision to raise bread prices by 30%. food riots last week left 13 dead. bread will now be sold at its previous price of 14 cents. every year since 1998, more than 30,000 japanese people have killed themselves. japan's health ministry estimates cases of suicide and depression caused the economy $32 billion last year. the government has launched a task force to address the problem. more than two weeks of political deadlock have ended in australia with confirmation that labor's julia gillard will continue as prime minister, would be backing, at last, of to independenct mp's. she has been near west possible majority. nick bryant has this. >> it is like the finale of a tv reality show, with the winner kept a closely-guarded secret until announced l
austerity measures dealing with french pension reform. welcome to bbc news. good to have you with us. we are broadcasting to our viewers in the united kingdom and around the world with me, james bagwell. u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton has spoken out against the plan to burn korans. general david petraeus said if it went ahead, images of the event would be used by insurgents to incite violence. coming up, we will hear what hillary clinton had to say with this report from washington. >> this is what worries general david petraeus is. 500 people in kabul, gather to demonstrate. one small church in america plans to bring copies of the koran. protesters threw rocks. >> we are concerned about the possible implications of a koran burning in the united states. it puts us in jeopardy. we have even seen trouble on just a rumor that this could take place, and i think that the images from such an activity could very well be used by extremists here and around the world in the same way that they use images from abu ghraib and some other incidents, over the years since 9/11. >> at outreach cen
is a sports consultant for the newspaper did. thank you for being with us. how ingrained is the gambling industry in the game of cricket? >> i think it is hugely ingrained, but the differences like in england, india, or the sub-continent, betting is illegal. a large amount of the money invested goes unnoticed, no one knows who is betting, how much, or on what. >> are you then implying that expecting in cricket were legalized, it would remove some of this criminality that we have seen, for example, it in pakistan's tour of england? >> it would definitely help. for instance, this alleged bookmaker, the middle man who took a lot of money from a newspaper -- if he had bet legally, the money have gotten recorded in some shops in england. but if done in the sub- continent, no one knows how much money. in legalized betting would mean at least if you suspect some match, you can go back and track names, find out if someone has put in in unusual bet against the odd. if you find a large number having bet against the odds and having a huge winning exchanging hands because of that -- at least a good
of the matter. u.s. middle east envoy's george -- middle east envoy george mitchell's assessment of talks between israel and palestinians. the pope has described the uk as a third-world country. welcome to "bbc world news" -- broadcast to our viewers on pbs in america, also of around the globe. coming up later for you, against a backdrop of st. protests, france's lower house passes the bill which raises the retirement age from 60 to 62, and hope for track and chile's miners. -- trapped miners. a new arrival lists some of the gloom -- lifts some of the gloom. hello to you. millions of people across central and western africa are going hungry. yes, the numbers are in the millions. the worst of the country is even larger than the states of california and texas together, but with a population of just 15 million. delta been flooding of ruined crops, and some help has arrived, but it has not been enough. we have this special report. >> according to the united nations, development terms, it is the world's poorest nation. for the past year, the united nations has been appealing to the internation
of the matter. u.s. middle east envoy george mitchell's assessment of the talks between israelis and palestinians. a senior vatican official describes the uk as a third world country. he has pulled out of the pope's statement. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america, also run the globe. coming up later, outside, the streets ring with protests. inside, france's lower house passes the bill which will raise the retirement age from 60 to 62, and serving therapy. can riding a wave help you call for mental health problems? public service is putting in health care money to find out. hello to you. millions -- yes, millions -- of people are going hungry at this moment across central and western africa. the worst affected country is niger, a country even larger than the united states of california and texas together, but with a population of just 15 million. the drought's amid flooding of ruined crops. help has not been enough. we go to niger for this special report. >> according to the united nations, in development terms, niger is the world's poorest nation. for the past year, the unite
warns against the dangers of secularism on his visit. the human cost of the u.s. financial downturn -- possibly -- poverty levels rise to their highest level in nearly 50 years. eu summit rows. the french president vows to press on. >> frenchmen and women have to know that this policy will continue while strictly abiding by the letter and spirit of our republican laws. >> welcome to "bbc world news" -- broadcast to our viewers on pbs in america and also or around the globe. coming up later, women in a man's world. the dangers of being a female candidate in afghanistan's elections. and when millions of its people face hunger, why does niger continue to export food. -- why does niger continue to export food? hello. it is the first state visit by a pope since the 16th century when henry viii broke from rome and formed the anglican church. some 450 years later, this visit is not without controversy. the pope has been forced to of knowledge failings' over pedophile priests, and he issued a warning about the dangers of what he called aggressive secularism in britain. in a moment, a report
east peace deal at a critical point. today, hillary clinton is in the west bank. the u.s. secretary of state holds stock with palestinian leader abbas. the settlement issue poses a massive challenge. >> welcome to gmt. also in the program, hopes rise for a quicker rescue of the chilean miners. hundreds of thousands joined the party in mexico to celebrate to lanier's of independence. it is midday in london and in washington, they're just waking up to the news that the obama administration is ramping up its efforts to inject momentum into middle east peace negotiations. today, hillary clinton has been in the west bank for talks with the president of the palestinian authority, president abbas. that follows talks between a bas and netanyahu yesterday. >> pressing on with the american peace mission, hillary clinton met the palestinian president. >> the united states and all of us led by president obama are very committed and determined to work toward a peace agreement through direct negotiations that lead to an independent, sovereign, viable palestinian state that realizes the aspiration
to the economy, but also to the president with a record low approval rating. >> the government is forcing us into a showdown. the only thing that can make as budget is a showdown. >> that showdown may force the government into further concessions, perhaps of face saver for the unions. two-thirds of the country are for reforms already approved by the house. it is president sarkozy who has the open hand. -- the upper hand. startednd's economy has to shrink again, despite coming out of recession earlier this year. gdp was down by 1.2% on the first quarter of the year. that contrasts with predictions it would have a small increase. the controversial diabetes drug avandia has been suspended. it has been linked to increased risk of heart failure. youtube and its owners have won a landmark piracy case brought by a spanish tv channel. each channel said its rights and violated when its videos were broadcast on youtube. the court found it was the copyright holder's responsibility to report the contents to youtube. the chairman for the international palate -- panel on climate change. it was reported th
ago was the closest in modern memory. the australian people told us and they told us this in no uncertain terms on that date and in the days that have followed is this. we will be held more accountable than ever before. >> last week, tony abbott described himself as the head of a government in waiting. today, he was forced to concede defeat. >> the coalition won more votes and more seats than our p opponent, but sadly we did not get a chance to form a government. >> australia has grown used to strong and decisive government. this one looks altogether more fragile and raises the obvious question. how long will it last? >> one way you can cemented this government together is to spend a lot of money. julia gillard has started doing just that. she has promised almost 10 billion australian dollars to education and development. given the narrowness of the parliamentary majority now, all it would take would be for the liberal government to lose a single election sometime over the next few years, and australia would have to return to the polls. >> does that mean that you will
is possible. the u.s. middle east envoy says israeli and palestinian leaders have made progress on the issue of jewish settlements. making our way down the indus river, we continue our coverage on pakistan's floods down and how the survivors are pairing. tens of thousands of mexicans celebrate their independence from spain 200 years ago. welcome to bbc news, broadcasting to our viewers in the u.k. and around the world. a senior papal adviser has pulled out of the pope's visit to the u.k. after making critical comments about the country in a magazine article. cardinal kasper said arriving at heathrow airport is like entering a third world country. he also claimed there was a new and aggressive atheism in britain. he said illness and not the interview was the reason behind his withdrawal. the pope's visit begins in scotland in a few hours time. >> colonel walter casper is a vatican insiders. he has been a senior aide to pope benedict for a decade. his role is to promote christian unity. he was part of the pope's entourage to britain. now, just hours before pope benedict's plane lands, the card
and palestinian leaders not to miss this chance for peace. as the u.s. combat mission in iraq comes to an end, the american vice-president says baghdad is close to a new government. no regrets from tony blair about his decision to send british troops to invade iraq. very warm welcome to "bbc world news," broadcast to our viewers in the states on pbs and also around the globe, with me, peter dobbie. coming up later for you -- how your name and postcode can affect your chances of getting a job in france. and new pictures of the world's most famous ship wreck -- the titanic in 3-d. the u.s. president barack obama has urged israelis and palestinians not to let slip an opportunity for peace that he says may not soon return. he made the remark as he opened a landmark peace talks. our middle east editor jeremy bowen reports from washington. >> if it feels as though they have all been this way before. an american president, and israeli prime minister, launching a new attempt at middle east peace in fact -- -- these at the white house and condemning bloodshed. >> there are going to be those who do eve
is an example of what we are up against. >> benjamin netanyahu thanked the u.s. president for his efforts and described the talks says "open and productive." >> id president's statement is an expression of our -- i think the president's statement is an expression of our determination to fight and you have talks that are open, productive, and serious in the quest for peace, also centered around the need for security arrangements that are able to roll back this kind of terror and threats to security. and that is a fundamental element, an important foundation of the peace we seek, and i appreciate, mr. president, your efforts to advance this beast -- peace for us and our neighbors and, i think we can say, the world. >> mr. obama also welcomed the leaders of the palestinian and the israelis. king abdullah and other leaders will join the talks. but is there it now and new commitment to achieve peace? our correspondent reports from the west bank on what are the unresolved tensions. >> on a hill overlooking the city of jerusalem, hundreds of jewish settlers came to bury the dead. the symmetry is
. but the australian people told us in no uncertain terms on that day and the days that followed is this -- that we will be held more accountable than ever before. >> the election august 21 ended in deadlock. neither julia gillard nor tony abbott's liberal coalition succeeded in forming a government. the arithmetic was not balanced. yesterday, it was neck and neck. do you get right -- julia gillard had 74 seats. tony abbott had 73. first, a vote for tony abbott, giving both sides 74 seats. but then the but -- two for julia gillard. last week, the opposition leader tony abbott described himself as the head of the government in waiting. today, he was forced to concede. >> the coalition won more seats than our opponents, but sadly, we did not get the opportunity to form a government. >> there has not been a hung parliament here since the second world war. australians are used to strong and decisive government. this one looks altogether more for agile and raises the question -- how long will it last? nick bryant, bbc news, sydney. >> and six months after their election in iraq, still no government. gab
the economy, but the president with a record low approval rating. >> the government is forcing us to a showdown. the only thing that can make them budget is a showdown. >> that may force the government to make further concessions, but two-thirds of the country are resigned to reforms already approved by the lower house. with the senate vote looking to be a formality, president sarkozy has the upper hand. christian fraser, bbc news, paris. >> our economy has started to shrink again. it came out of recession earlier this year. dee dee was down by 1.2% on the first quarter of the year -- gdp was down by 1.2%. youtube and its owner, googles, have one of landmark piracy case brought by a spanish tv channel. the court ruled it was the responsibility of the copyright owner to tell googol -- google that their property appeared on the youtube. the suspension of of controversial diabetes drugcontroversialavandia. -- controversial diabetes drug, avandia. it is linked to an increased risk of heart failure. it was supposed to be a showcase moment for india, showing itself to be a global power.
and the doubters. it george mitchell gave a good assessment after the first session of talks. >> all of us reaffirm our commitment to reaching a shared goal for the just, lasting, and lasting peace. >> -- proper peace. >> the issue that is sticking is the settlements. the palestinians are threatening to walk away unless there is no more settlements. the israelis say this is not possible. the prime minister is pinned in by a coalition pressing him not to give ground. how much progress is made on the issue has not emerged. the parties have sat together for two long sessions and will return to jerusalem for more talks tomorrow. so, no big announcements and the best anyone can hope for is that they are continuing. there will be many long hard days of communications and negotiation if this is to bear fruit. >> she has been held in solitary confinement for more than a year but today the u.s. female hiker was reported -- was released from iran. she and her companions were accused of spying. they insist that they got lost in iraq. according to her mother, she has been denied treatment for serious health pr
and put on planes to romania. >> today the european union used enprecedented language to rebuke one of its most powerful states >> this is a digrace. >> the commissioner said there was paralleling with world war ii >> this is a situation i would thought europe would not have to witness again after the second world war. >> enough is enough. >> the french government says the roma are actually given 300 euros each when they leave the county >> france is a proud founding member and rarely received such a dressing down and deliberately mislead the eu. part of the union's anger relates to an internal french memo when mentions dimantels roma camps a priority. some see it as targeting ethnic group. >> i am against discrimination. >> i think the french government is not totally wrong. >> it's pointed out here that other countries have removed thousands of romas without attracting such criticism. and the help hasn't been fully used. but today's comments are a huge embarrassment to an embattled president, sarkozy, now he stands as playing the tough cop. so far, he has not responded to today's atta
religious beliefs from public cause, and to privatize it. yet, it is leading us to look upon it. >> only the advantagization of culture could cull back the dictatorship. >> as the shadows lengthened, among the crowd, the baby he kissed, the mother of -- among the thousands of migrants. >> i cried. i was very happy. this is my daughter. i brought her in. she is mine. >> before today, there was some nervousness in the church about whether this day would succeed, a pessimism even. not now. "bbc news" at bellahouston park. >> france is on heightened security alert. during a visit to the eiffel tower, the french interior minister pointed to bomb alerts that led to the evacuation of the to your itself and the kidnapping of five french nationals in nigeria -- nig emp r in wes africa. >> in the united states, a man shot and wounded a doctor, shot his mother and then killed himself in baltimore. a spokesman said the doctor is undergoing surgery and is expected to survive. 19 members of a drug cartel have been killed in a clash with security forces in north eastern mexico. mexican police said they
is the biggest threat to the world. they use chemical, biological or nuclear weapons if they could. western policies are not designed to confront radical islam. the chinese government ordered three producers to start growing more vegetables. it is another reason this is causing unrest. seven people died in mozambique over the rising cost of bread. the food agencies called for a special meeting to discuss the implications of a price spike. >> more wildfires in southern russia stand by strong winds and more loss of life after 50 people were killed in july and august. underlying it all is the prolonged drought. they destroyed 20% of the wheat crop this year. the government has extended its ban on wheat exports. thousands of kilometers away in mozambique's lies [unintelligible] after two days of food riots. this was a sharp rise in the cost of bread. seven people were killed when police opened fire on protesters trip nearly 300 were injured. what is happening to food prices? is there a risk of a repeat of the food crisis of 2008? from 2003 on the world saw prices climbing. the global food index
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)